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ICWSM 2010 Blog

Friday, March 5, 2010


Response to Ed Chi about the review process

In a comment to a previous post Ed Chi asked:

Can you give some transparency to how decisions are made to reduce a full paper to a poster / short paper?
In answer - the review process this year was somewhat different from previous years:

- For each paper, one SPC-member meta-reviewer and three PC-member reviewers were assigned, primarily based on bidding, with some manual balancing of the reviewers by the PC chairs (in part based on requests from the SPC).

- The PC members submitted reviews independently (i.e., without seeing the other reviews)

- The SPC member then led a discussion of the paper, in the case of any substantive disagreement, and wrote a fourth review summarizing the results. Sometimes extra reviews were asked for at this point. The discussion is not available to the authors, although the SPC members were encouraged to summarize it in the meta-review.

At this point, if everyone's done their job - there's a lot of information about each paper, but all the decisions were based on a very local view of the pool of submissions (as each reviewer sees only 8-10 papers), and reviewers tend to calibrate their scores differently in different sub-areas. In the final stage, a small group - Sam and I, with some help from Marti and previous ICWSM organizers - looked over all the papers, reading the reviews for many of them, the meta-reviews for all of them, and sometimes the papers themselves - to give a final ranking. Aside from the raw scores for the paper, we considered the overall topical balance of the conference, and the perceived breadth of interest in a paper, but these were secondary considerations. This discussion is also not provided to the authors.

BTW, my comment about this year having a strong pool of submissions wasn't polite conversation. There were a half-dozen papers with an average score of 8.5 or above, 16 papers with an average score of 8 or above, and 30 with an average score of 7 or above. After looking the papers over one of our first steps was to figure out what was the maximal amount of papers we could present as plenaries (25), given the time constraints of the conference, and we spent a lot of time discussing the papers that were close to the cut-off. We also considered but rejected the possibility of introducing parallel sessions this year.

William Cohen
co-PC chair


Data challenge workshop deadline: March 10th

Just a heads-up, the deadline for submitting papers to the ICWSM 2010
data workshop is March 10th! See for submission details.

Thursday, March 4, 2010


ICWSM paper decisions are done!

The technical-paper decisions for ICWSM have now been made, and notices have been sent out.

Overall there were 133 papers, posters, and demos submitted. Of these, 25 were accepted for plenary presentation - which is the maximum we could schedule in a single track. An additional 54 were accepted as posters, and 2 were accepted as demos. A list of accepted papers will be posted on the web site soon, with a detailed schedule to follow.

I'd like to give a big "thank you" to the PC and SPC for all their hard work, and the authors for writing and submitting a very strong group of papers!

- William

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